No B.S. Coaching Advice

You Don’t Need an A+ in Every Class You Take in Life | Career Angles

Sometimes people make too many sacrifices at too great a price.

TRANSCRIPT

H!! This is Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter and this is (DADADA) well, it
should be No BS Coaching Advice but it lists as No BS Job Search Advice. So if
you watch this on YouTube, you’ll be correct. I like to spend some time each
day at noon trying to help people play bigger and providing advice to
individuals, whether it’s individuals or organizations about playing their
professional and personal games bigger.. That’s because folks need coaching. You know, at
the end of the day, people are making way too many mistakes by trying to tough it out
and do it by themselves. And there’s no need to do that. So, if we’re joined then I’ll
have someone grab a seat and we’ll do a blab that way. Otherwise, I’m
just going to do a quick little lecture here or have a quick fireside chat,
talking about a call I was just on for a mastermind I’m involved with. Now, we have
eight of us who get together weekly on. Friday mornings and we spend about an
hour with one other and the mastermind here was about . . . well, each of us working
on particular objectives that we have, personally and professionally. One of the
people on the call had an interesting observation. He’s trying to right now
he’s trying to go into business for himself and for now, he’s a contractor to
a number of different organizations and interesting guy, very smart. And he’s a
great employee but he struggles to look out for himself, looking out for the
entrepreneurial part of himself. And as he was talking, he had a goal in
mind for the week where he was supposed to do some work on an e-book he’s
involved with, put in a certain amount of time, and came up short. And part of the
reason I think he came up short is he’d had a conversation with his largest
particular client and they basically said they kind of viewed him as an outsider
and, as a result, hadn’t given him the raise that he expected to receive that
many other people got. Now, where am Ieading with this? Real simple. In his

case, he’s started to realize his perfectionist qualities keep getting in
the way of him looking out for himself, that each assignment he gets from a
client of his, he tries to do to a hundred ninety percent of his ability. He
is really well-prepared, well organized, he does homework before each workshop
and, as he was talking, he said something. I thought was wonderful. I think he gave
credit to me. I think it may have been someone else there who may have said it
to him. I’ll take his word for it I said this little pearl and he said “you keep
trying to shoot for an A and a lot of classes were pass/fail.” You know, there’s
a lot of things that we do where good enough work is good enough and we don’t
have to shoot for the moon all the time.. We can shoot for getting a passing grade
and it’s going to be perfectly fine. Now I know this runs contrary to what a lot of
solopreneurs are taught now. As a solopreneur you talk “yeah you have to
give exquisite effort. So you under promise and over deliver all the time.
And that’s the goal as a solopreneur. Make them fall in love. You say you’re
going to do one thing and you do two hundred percent of it. How’s that working?
Yet, for a lot of folks, they don’t get business from it. But is it worth the
additional effort that you’re putting in for the results that you’re getting? “Oh
I’m putting seeds in the ground. At the end of the day, they’ll
bear fruit . . . and that’s certainly possible.. But you don’t necessarily have to do two
hundred percent. You can do a hundred a quarter. You can do a hundred percent,
damn it and wind up in a situation where you look great to the client, you’ve done
terrific work. They’re happy and you haven’t killed yourself and you’ve still
got stuff leftover in your gas tank to work on your own stuff. So I want to
encourage you, folks, if there’s an opportunity to . . . I want to say it,
play smaller, but to do great work, but not super spectacular unbelievable work,
do great work, it’s going to be terrific. The client is going to appreciate it. You’ll
love it and you’re not going to leave all your energy behind and not be able
to look out for yourself or your family.. At the end of the day, all of us
are self-employed. I don’t care if you are an employee of a company, the large firm is
writing a check to you every week for your work, makes no difference. You’re
still self-employed and you have to think like a self-employed individual. As
a self-employed individual, you’re looking out for your own instincts, your
own needs. You’re the chairman of the board of your own company and your
shareholders are their wife, husband, partner, kids or kid or kids and you have
to look out for their own interests and if you have nothing left in the tank
afterward, it’s not going to be a lot of fun for you. You’re not going to
get as much done. So remember, you’re the chairman of your organization. In my case
let’s say it’s the Altman Organization.. It’s my last name so
recognize you are the chairman of your own firm. You have to look out for your own
instincts and not do too much. I’m Jeff. Altman. I’m going to say very simply i
hope you enjoyed this. I’ll be back on Monday with more advice for you have a
great day!

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1800 episodes, Career Angles | Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunterand is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

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